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Mosley addresses COVID-19 panic, precautions

Harlan County Judge-Executive Dan Mosley took to Facebook on Monday to address community members about the widespread COVID-19 taking most of the world by storm. Mosley’s response to the panic and precautions? We will all get through this together.

“We currently have zero confirmed cases in Harlan County. However, that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t take this pandemic seriously,” Mosley said. “This virus is spreading invidious parts of the state and country, causing serious problems, and sadly, can be fatal.”

He added Governor Andy Beshear asked restaurants and bars across the state to close dining room options to the public. Mosley asked the public to “please continue to support” them by ordering take-out or utilizing the drive-thru.

“The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that for the next eight weeks, organizers cancel or postpone in-person events that consist of 50 people or more throughout the United States,” he said. “The state is taking steps to waive the waiting period for unemployment for those who are losing their jobs because of the COVID-19. The state will also waive any work search requirements while the state of emergency is in effect.”

Mosley went on to say, in order to maintain a safe workplace, he will be implementing a policy for fiscal court employees and those who work in other county owned facilities.

“Employees or those who work in county government owned facilities, who are traveling internationally, or have immediate family members who live in the same home traveling internationally, by plane or boat, will be required to stay home once they or the family member return from their trip for 14 days,” he said. “This precautionary move necessary to ensure the safety of our employees, their families, all county employees, citizens and our communities. I strongly encourage other businesses, schools districts and non-profits to do the same.”

Mosley said the Senior Citizens Center in Harlan will be closed for at least the next two weeks, with school systems also announcing closures.

“What we have to remember is that all of us as a member of this county, state, country and world have a responsibility to protect the health of ourselves, the ones that rely on us and look out for each other,” Mosley said. “Let’s adhere to that responsibility now more than ever and prevent the spread of this virus and many others by being smart about where we go, what we do and when we must be in public.

“Stay safe, be smart and may God bless each of you.”

Mosley also compiled the following list for what community members should be doing as of now:

• Remain calm, keep your hands washed frequently and keep your hands away from your face. Wash hands for at least 20 seconds in warm, soapy water.

• If you are sick, stay home. If you are concerned about your health, and it’s not an emergency, call and speak to your doctor’s office and get their advice. If you have COVID-19 symptoms, do not show up at a crowded emergency room or expose others. Call your healthcare provider to learn how to protect yourself and everyone around you. You can also call the state’s COVID-19 hotline at 1-800-722-5725 to seek guidance on the level of care you need or if you have questions.

• All of us should avoid crowds. If you’re 60 years or older, limit your time in public. Those 60 and older with heart, lung or kidney issues should not get on a cruise ship, frequent an airport or fly anywhere on a commercial aircraft at this time. This segment of the population is considered most vulnerable to catching the virus.

• Talk to your children about the importance of washing their hands. Also explain to them what is going on and how they can help keep this virus from spreading by practicing good hygiene.

• Practice social distancing. Try to keep at least 6 feet of distance between yourself and those around you to prevent the spread of germs. If someone gets too close for comfort, politely ask them to back away to protect the both of you.

The COVID-19 pandemic is a developing story and will continue to be posted and updated as a way to keep the public informed. For more information on the virus in Kentucky, visit www.kycovid19.ky.gov.