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Bevin pardons individuals in Bell, Harlan counties

Four individuals who were prosecuted in Harlan and Bell County Circuit Court have been pardoned by Governor Matt Bevin. Chandra Dawn Blevins, Randell Bruce Goins, Jennifer Jeanette Adams and Jacqueline Lacy Day were all pardoned by the exiting governor for crimes they previously committed.

Blevins, of Harlan, was convicted in Bell County in 2013 on four counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument, four counts of theft of identity and four counts of theft by deception. In Harlan County Circuit Court, she was convicted of theft of identity, three counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument, theft of mail matter and four counts of receiving stolen property.

“After struggling with addiction and the law-breaking lifestyle it led to, Chandra Blevins has emerged as a new woman,” said Bevin in the executive order. “Her devotion to her faith, her family and her community is highly commendable.

“I hope that she and her children are as proud of her as I am. She is a great role model to other who have followed a similar early path in life. I am confident that Chandra has a very bright and significant future ahead of her.”

In the case of Goins, of Cumberland Gap, Tenn., he was convicted in Bell County in 2004 for trafficking in marijuana and possession of a controlled substance, alcohol and paraphernalia. In 2002, he was convicted of two counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument. He was also convicted of trafficking in marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia in 2001.

“Randell Goins made a series of decisions to break the law some years ago. Since then, he has helped fight against the prison bureaucracy and has progressed well in his efforts to turn his life around and serve others,” said Bevin. “I expect that Mr. Goins will do great things for his family, his community and for Kentucky in the years ahead.”

Day, of Cumberland, was convicted in Harlan County in 2011 for trafficking a controlled substance. In the executive order, Bevin said she “is an example to others, and her service is a blessing to her family and her community.”

Adams, of Evarts, was convicted in Harlan County in 2010 for trafficking a controlled substance.

“Jennifer Adams is a woman who has taken the broken pieces of her life and turned them into something beautiful,” said Bevin. “She is an amazing example for others to follow and, as a person who is continuously serving others, she is a true blessing to those around her.”

The local pardons were part of over 400 pardons made by Bevin since the Nov. 5 election, according to the Kentucky Secretary of State’s office.