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Partnership for more organ donors a good one

As this editorial is being written, there are nearly 115,000 people in this country who are waiting for an organ transplant.

Sadly, some of these people will pass away while waiting for an organ. It’s a sad reality many people face on a daily basis. Those waiting for organs want to continue living their lives, but in many cases they simply are too far down the waiting list, or their disease is so far advanced that a new organ would only buy them a small amount of time.

There are many variables that play into getting an organ from a donor. Organ life spans vary from patient to patient. Variables include how long it took for the organ to reach the recipient, how effectively the organ was cooled, the possibility of chronic rejection and patient aftercare. The overall survival rate in the U.S. is estimated at 88 percent after one year and about 75 percent after five years.

The most common organs people require are new hearts, lungs and kidneys. People receive tissue in the form of heart valves, skin, bone and tendons, with which physicians can replace a patient’s veins, mend hearts or treat severe burns.

Thankfully, there are people who sign up to be organ donors, but there could always be a lot more to help save others’ lives.

This is why we appreciate The Medical Center partnering with the Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates to recruit and sign up 100 new tissue and organ donors this year.

Officials at The Medical Center are seeking more organ donors with the partnership and are saying that it has become somewhat difficult to get people to sign up to be an organ donor. Officials say some people are just uneasy about it. We can understand why some may feel that way, but donating an organ to save a life is a worthy cause.

In 2018, The Medical Center arranged for 13 eye donations, four tissue donations and zero organ donations — though that wasn’t from a lack of need, officials say.

This is all the more reason to become an organ donor because there is not only a need, but it could mean the difference between life and death for people needing the organs.

To become a tissue and organ donor, anyone with a valid driver’s license can sign up on organdonor.gov. After someone renews his or her driver’s license, the new card will carry the donor insignia.

Donor identities remain confidential for one year, after which family members can accept communication — if desired.

The Bowling Green Daily News